Global Lancets Market Overview

Lancets are a pricking needle used to obtain drops of blood for testing. Lancets are being increasingly used by patients affected by cardiovascular and endocrine-related complications. Lancets are designed to only be used once, and then disposed of in a safe way.   These devices are being used for cholesterol and glucose tests, heelstick screening tests or phenylketonuria (PKU) tests in newborns, as well as for severely burned or scarred emergency patients, extremely obese patients and thrombotic-tendency patients.   In the last several years, global market of Lancets developed year by year, with an average growth rate of 6.9% for the sales. In 2016, global revenue of Lancets is nearly 1260 M USD; the sale is about 47 billion units.   The classification of Lancets includes Safety Lancets, Homecare Lancets. The proportion of Homecare Lancets in 2016 is about 78.6%, and the proportion is in decreasing trend from 2012 to 2016. The Safety Lancet is enjoying more and more market share.   Lancets are widely used in cholesterol tests, glucose tests and other tests. The more than half of lancets is used in glucose test, and the sales proportion in 2016 is about 75%, but the Lancets used in cholesterol test is enjoying more and more market share.   According to WHO, The number of people with diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 450 million in 2016, The global prevalence of diabetes among adults over 18 years of age has risen from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.7% in 2016, Diabetes prevalence has been rising more rapidly in middle- and low-income countries. Affected by demand, there is a rapid increase of lancets industry. During 2012--2017, lancets industry kept increasing at a high speed, which in China CAGR is 6.5% in 2012-2017. In the next few years, lancets industry will maintain increasing at a relatively high growth rate. Investors are still optimistic about this area; the future will still have more new investment enter the field. GlobalInfoResearch All Rights Reserved  

Manipulating electron spins without loss of information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel's Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X. For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled to its motion, i.e. its orbit within the chip. This spin-orbit coupling allows targeted manipulation of the electron spin by an external electric field, but it also causes the spin's orientation to decay, which leads to a loss of information. In an international collaboration with colleagues from the US and Brazil, scientists from the University of Basel's Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, headed by Professor Dominik Zumbühl, have developed a new method that allows for targeted spin manipulation without the accompanying decay. Controlling spins over long distances The scientists have developed a chip on which an electron rotates uniformly in its orbit through the material without decay of the spin. The spin's orientation follows a spiral pattern similar to a helix. If the voltages applied by two gate electrodes change, it affects the wavelength of the helix; the orientation of the spin can thus be influenced by a voltage change. The Rashba and Dresselhaus fields predominantly determine the helical movement of the spin. In the experiment described above, the Dresselhaus and Rashba fields can be kept at the same level, while the overall strength of the two fields can simultaneously be controlled: in this way, the spin's decay can be suppressed. This allows the researchers to use voltages to adjust the spin's orientation over distances greater than 20 micrometers, which is a particularly large distance on a chip and corresponds to many spin rotations. Spin information can thus be transmitted e.g. between different quantum bits. Adjusting the fields with electrical voltages This method is only possible because, as this work showed experimentally for the first time, both the Rashba field and the Dresselhaus field can be adjusted with electrical voltages. Although this was predicted more than 20 years ago in a theoretical study, it has only now been possible to demonstrate it thanks to a newly-developed measurement method based on quantum interference effects at low temperatures near absolute zero. It is expected, however, that the helix will also be able to be controlled with voltages at higher temperatures and even at room temperature. Basis for further developments "With this method, we can not only influence the spin orientation in situ but also control the transfer of electron spins over longer distances without losses," says Zumbühl. The outstanding collaboration with colleagues from the University of São Paulo, the University of California and the University of Chicago provides the basis for a whole new generation of devices that build on spin-based electronics and create prospects for further experimental work. Story Source: Materials provided by University of Basel. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Manipulating electron spins without loss of information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel's Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X. For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled to its motion, i.e. its orbit within the chip. This spin-orbit coupling allows targeted manipulation of the electron spin by an external electric field, but it also causes the spin's orientation to decay, which leads to a loss of information. In an international collaboration with colleagues from the US and Brazil, scientists from the University of Basel's Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, headed by Professor Dominik Zumbühl, have developed a new method that allows for targeted spin manipulation without the accompanying decay. Controlling spins over long distances The scientists have developed a chip on which an electron rotates uniformly in its orbit through the material without decay of the spin. The spin's orientation follows a spiral pattern similar to a helix. If the voltages applied by two gate electrodes change, it affects the wavelength of the helix; the orientation of the spin can thus be influenced by a voltage change. The Rashba and Dresselhaus fields predominantly determine the helical movement of the spin. In the experiment described above, the Dresselhaus and Rashba fields can be kept at the same level, while the overall strength of the two fields can simultaneously be controlled: in this way, the spin's decay can be suppressed. This allows the researchers to use voltages to adjust the spin's orientation over distances greater than 20 micrometers, which is a particularly large distance on a chip and corresponds to many spin rotations. Spin information can thus be transmitted e.g. between different quantum bits. Adjusting the fields with electrical voltages This method is only possible because, as this work showed experimentally for the first time, both the Rashba field and the Dresselhaus field can be adjusted with electrical voltages. Although this was predicted more than 20 years ago in a theoretical study, it has only now been possible to demonstrate it thanks to a newly-developed measurement method based on quantum interference effects at low temperatures near absolute zero. It is expected, however, that the helix will also be able to be controlled with voltages at higher temperatures and even at room temperature. Basis for further developments "With this method, we can not only influence the spin orientation in situ but also control the transfer of electron spins over longer distances without losses," says Zumbühl. The outstanding collaboration with colleagues from the University of São Paulo, the University of California and the University of Chicago provides the basis for a whole new generation of devices that build on spin-based electronics and create prospects for further experimental work. Story Source: Materials provided by University of Basel. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Shining rings: A new material emits white light when exposed to electricity

Scientists at Nagoya University have developed a new way to make stimuli-responsive materials in a predictable manner. They used this method to design a new material, a mixture of carbon nanorings and iodine, which conducts electricity and emits white light when exposed to electricity. The team's new approach could help generate a range of reliable stimuli-responsive materials, which can be used in memory devices, artificial muscles and drug delivery systems, among other applications. Nagoya, Japan -- Stimuli-responsive materials alter their own properties in response to external stimuli, such as photo-irradiation, heat, pressure and electricity. This feature can be controlled for a wide range of uses, such as in optical discs, computer memories and displays, as well as artificial muscles and drug delivery systems. Researchers have been working to develop new stimuli-responsive materials in a predictable fashion. However, it has been extremely difficult to design and control the complex molecular arrangements of the materials. Now, a simple and reliable method to synthesize stimuli-responsive materials has been developed by a team led by Nagoya University's JST-ERATO Itami Molecular Nanocarbon Project and the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM). The results of this study were recently reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition. The 'responsive porous host' method takes a molecule with a porous framework and binds to it a 'guest' molecule that is likely to react to external stimuli. In this case, the team found that [10]cycloparaphenylene ([10]CPP), a hydrocarbon molecule composed of 10 para-connected benzene rings, made an ideal host when combined with iodine (I). Iodine situated itself inside the porous carbon rings, and reacted to electric stimulation. Not only did it conduct electricity, it also emitted a white light, which is unusual. Typically, many other components are required to obtain the white color. This shows the potential of the new material, [10]CPP-I, for next generation illumination systems. "This 'responsive porous host' approach is expected to be applicable to different stimuli, such as photo-irradiation, heat application and pH change, and open the path for devising a generic strategy for the development of stimuli-responsive materials in a controllable and predictable fashion," said Dr. Hirotoshi Sakamoto, a group leader of the JST-ERATO project. Synthesizing the material is surprisingly simple -- the researchers mixed carbon nanorings (CPP) and iodine together, and let it dry. X-ray crystallography confirmed that the iodine molecules line up inside the hollow core of the aligned nanorings. The team tried several variations of the mixture, changing the number of carbon nanorings, and found that 10 rings led to the most dynamic iodine atom movement and the most sensitive response to external environmental changes. When a direct current was applied to [10]CPP-I, the bulk resistivity of the sample became approximately 380 times lower, indicating that it conducted electricity rather than resisting electrical transmission. The bulk resistivity in mixtures with 9 or 12 nanorings did not decrease nearly as much. These results show that pore size in the nanoring assembly controls the response to electrical stimulation. "One of the most difficult parts of this research was to investigate how the electric conductivity of [10]CPP-I is turned on by electric stimuli," said Dr. Noriaki Ozaki, a postdoctoral researcher of the JST-ERATO project. "Although it only took us about three months to synthesize the molecule and discover its electric-stimuli-responsive properties, it took another year to discover the origin of its properties." The team finally figured out how the electric conductivity of [10]CPP-I is turned on by electric stimuli, using X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), Raman spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. These analyses showed that the iodine atoms in the carbon nanorings form extended polyiodide chains when stimulated by electricity, which gave the material electrical conductivity. The researchers also discovered that electric stimuli can switch the photoluminescence color of [10]CPP-I from a green-blue color to a white color. White luminescence means that the fluorescence spectrum of [10]CPP-I covers the whole visible light range. Spectral broadening is attributed to the irregular distribution of the electronic structures of CPPs, which is caused by the formation of polyiodide chains. The white luminescence of [10]CPP-I is a rare example of white illumination material from a single molecular assembly; white light emission is usually achieved by mixing several components of different colors. "We were really excited to develop this simple yet powerful method to achieve the synthesis of external-stimuli-response materials," said Professor Kenichiro Itami, director of the JST-ERATO project and center director of ITbM. Story Source: Materials provided by Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM), Nagoya University. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

New hydrocarbon fuel cells with high efficiency and low cost

The commercialization of the 'natural gas fuel cell' has finally come to the fore, thanks to the recent development of electrode materials that maintain long-term stability in hydrocarbon fuels. Advantage of using this material includes that it uses internal transition metal as a further catalyst in a fuel cell operating condition. This breakthrough comes from a research, conducted by Professor Guntae Kim of Energy and Chemical Engineering at UNIST in collaboration with Professor Jeeyoung Shin of Sookmyoung Women's University, Professor Jeong Woo Han of University of Seoul, Professor Young-Wan Ju of Wonkwang University, and Professor Hu Young Jeong of UNIST. Their results, published online in the June issue of the journal Nature Communications, have emerged as the promising candidate for the next generation direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) technology. A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is an electrochemical conversion device that produces electricity by oxidizing a fuel. SOFC is still subject to a fairly intense development for its unforgettable competitive benefits of long-term stability, a high fuel flexibility, low emissions, as well as relatively low cost. SOFCs are a possible next generation fuel cells, as they are capable of raising efficiency higher than 90% when using the exhaust heat. However, successful commercialization of SOFCs has been delayed due to its high production cost mainly related with the development of electrode materials in hydrocarbon fuel cells. Professor Kim has solved the problem of securing hydrogen by developing a new anode material (catalyst) which can directly use hydrocarbons, known as natural gas liquids (LGLs) and LPG, as a fuel of SOFC. Using this newly-developed catalyst, SOFC can operate the fuel cell without converting the hydrocarbon into hydrogen externally. In the study, the research team has proposed that transition metals are exsolved from the new anode material in reducing atmosphere. Generally, the transition metals act as fuel oxidation catalyst in SOFC. They also reported that the exsolved Co and Ni nanoparticles on the surface of the layered perovskite show good stability with no remarkable degradation. Moreover the single cell presents 1.2 W/cm2 in H2 at 800oC, indicating that the performance is twice as high as that of the conventional electrode material (0.6 W/cm2). "Although the existing anode materials demonstrated good initial performance, due to their long-term instability and complex manufacturing process, they could not be reliably operated when using hydrocarbon directly as fuel," says Professor Kim, corresponding author of the paper. "The new anode material reduces manufacturing process and maintains good stability, which is expected to accelerate the commercialization of the SOFC." According to the research team, their findings provide a key to understand the exsolution trends in transition metals (Mn, Co, Ni and Fe) containing perovskites and design highly catalytic perovskite oxides for fuel reforming and electro-oxidation. Story Source: Materials provided by Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST). Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Novel 3-D printing process strengthens parts by 275 percent

A doctoral student in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University has developed a method to transform the landscape of 3-D printing today by making 3-D printed parts 275% stronger and immediately useful in real-world applications. Sweeney began working with 3-D printed materials while employed at the Army Research Laboratory at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland. "I was able to see the amazing potential of the technology, such as the way it sped up our manufacturing times and enabled our CAD designs to come to life in a matter of hours," Sweeney said. "Unfortunately, we always knew those parts were not really strong enough to survive in a real-world application." 3-D printed objects are comprised of many thin layers of materials, usually plastics, deposited on top of each other to form a desired shape. These layers are prone to fracturing, causing issues with the durability and reliability of the part when used in a real-world application, for example a custom printed medical device. "I knew that nearly the entire industry was facing this problem," Sweeney said. "Currently, prototype parts can be 3-D printed to see if something will fit in a certain design, but they cannot actually be used for a purpose beyond that." When Sweeney started his doctorate, he was working with Green in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Texas Tech University. Green had been collaborating with Dr. Mohammad Saed, assistant professor in the electrical and computer engineering department at Texas Tech, on a project to detect carbon nanotubes using microwaves. The trio crafted an idea to use carbon nanotubes in 3-D printed parts, coupled with microwave energy to weld the layers of parts together. "The basic idea is that a 3-D part cannot simply be stuck into an oven to weld it together because it is plastic and will melt," Sweeney said. "We realized that we needed to borrow from the concepts that are traditionally used for welding parts together where you'd use a point source of heat, like a torch or a TIG welder to join the interface of the parts together. You're not melting the entire part, just putting the heat where you need it." Since the layers making up the 3-D printed parts are so tiny, special materials are utilized to control where the heat hits and bonds the layers together. "What we do is take 3-D printer filament and put a thin layer of our material, a carbon nanotube composite, on the outside," Sweeney said. "When you print the parts out, that thin layer gets embedded at the interfaces of all the plastic strands. Then we stick it in a microwave, we use a bit more of a sophisticated microwave oven in this research, and monitor the temperature with an infrared camera." The technology is patent-pending and licensed with a local company, Essentium Materials. The materials are produced in-house, where they have also designed a new 3-D printer technology to incorporate the electromagnetic welding process into the 3-D printer itself. While the part is being printed, they are welding it at the same time. They are currently in beta mode, but this has the potential to be on every industrial and consumer 3-D printer where strong parts are needed. "If you're an engineer and if you actually care about the mechanical properties of what you're making, then this ideally would be on every printer in that category," Sweeney said. Sweeney and Green applied the traditional welding concepts and a carbon nanotube composite filament to bond the submillimeter layers in a 3-D printed part together with focused microwaves: See a video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6s1aY7tmcU&feature=youtu.be Story Source: Materials provided by Texas A&M University. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

High-tech sensing illuminates concrete stress testing

Using the principles of light, University of Leeds scientists have discovered a new way to measure the strength of modern forms of concrete -- giving industry a better way to understand when it could fracture. Their approach was based on applying a complex light-refracting coating, designed to display stress positions, to the surface of concrete beam samples. The epoxy coating is 'birefringent' -- it has the ability to split light waves in different directions in relation to the amount of stress acting in those directions, and reflecting back to a photonic camera. The camera then takes a picture showing where the stress levels are most extreme before cracks or fractures occur. While the coating itself is not new, this research project was the first time it had been used to measure shear stress and assess concrete toughness against fractures. Dr Joseph Antony from the School of Chemical and Process Engineering at the leading Russell Group UK university, who led the study together with researchers at the University of Qatar, said: "There are other methods to measure stress and strain levels in the engineering sector, but we do not believe any of them can measure shear strain directly with high precision, which is most relevant to assess the failure strength of materials. "The photonic method we developed can directly measure sheer strain, even on opaque materials. Until now, photonic and optical methods of measurement have only been associated with transparent materials." The results using the new method compared favourably with conventional methods of stress testing, which have relied on combined experimental and numerical or analytical approaches. The rise of composite concretes now used extensively in the construction industry prompted the team to look for new ways to study the material's strength. Concrete has traditionally been made with cement, gravel and sand but has changed significantly in recent decades. It can now include numerous waste products including plastic pellets, in order to reduce the levels of natural materials used and to recycle waste products. Dr Antony added: "Our study was aimed at developing a method by which plastic or polymer waste materials, in this case from Qatar, could be used as valuable ingredients in developing new engineering products. "By working with industries which recycle the waste products into micron sized particles, we had direct insight into how they are used, meaning our study could be much more informed by industry requirements." Finding a new way to show industry the precise toughness of these new forms of composite concrete meant there could be more reliance on their use as a building material. Dr Antony explained how concrete made with waste plastic products had shown superior qualities to traditional ingredients, but his team wanted to ensure it could sustain service loads without fracturing. He added: "We believe this new photonic or optical approach to fracture testing could be applied not only to develop sustainable manufacturing using materials that would otherwise be discarded as waste, but also in other diverse engineering designs including mechanical, civil, materials, electronics and chemical engineering applications." The research was funded by the Qatar National Research Fund, and is published in Scientific Reports. Story Source: Materials provided by University of Leeds. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Molecular 'pulleys' improve battery performance

Silicon anodes are receiving a great deal of attention from the battery community. They can deliver 3~5-times higher capacities compared with those using current graphite anodes in lithium ion batteries. A higher capacity means longer battery use per charge, which is particularly critical in extending the driving mileage of all-electric vehicles. Although silicon is abundant and cheap, Si anodes have a limited charge-discharge cycle number, which is typically less than 100 times with microparticle sizes. Their volume expands enormously during each charge-discharge cycle, leading to fractures of the electrode particles or delamination of the electrode film equally even in decaying its capacity. A KAIST research team led by Professors Jang Wook Choi and Ali Coskun reported a molecular pulley binder for high-capacity silicon anodes of lithium ion batteries in Science on July 20. The KAIST team integrated molecular pulleys, called polyrotaxanes, into a battery electrode binder, a polymer included in battery electrodes to attach the electrodes onto metallic substrates. In a polyrotaxane, rings are threaded into a polymer backbone and can freely move along the backbone. The free moving of the rings in polyrotaxanes can follow the volume changes of the silicon particles. The rings' sliding motion can efficiently hold Si particles without disintegration during their continuous volume change. It is remarkable that even pulverized silicon particles can remain coalesced because of the high elasticity of the polyrotaxane binder. The functionality of the new binders is in sharp contrast with existing binders (usually simple linear polymers) with limited elasticity since existing binders are not capable of holding pulverized particles firmly. Previous binders allowed pulverized particles to scatter, and the silicon electrode thus degrades and loses its capacity. The authors said, "This is a good example of showing the importance of fundamental research. Polyrotaxane received Nobel Prize last year, based on the concept called 'mechanical bond.' The 'mechanical bond' is a newly identified concept, and can be added to classical chemical bonds in chemistry, such as covalent, ionic, coordination, and metallic bonds. The long fundamental study is now expanding in an unexpected direction that addresses longstanding challenges in battery technology." The authors also mentioned that they are currently under collaboration with a major battery maker to get their molecular pulleys integrated into real battery products. Sir Fraser Stoddart of Northwestern University, the 2016 Noble Laureate in Chemistry, also added, "Mechanical bonds have come to the rescue for the first time in an energy storage context. KAIST team's ingenious use of mechanical bonds in slide-ring polyrotaxanes -- based on polyethylene glycol threaded with functionalized alpha-cyclodextrin rings -- marks a breakthrough in the performance of marketable lithium-ion batteries. This important technological advance provides yet more evidence that when pulley-like polymers carrying mechanical bonds displace conventional materials based on chemical bonds alone, the unique influence of this physical bond on the properties of materials and the performance of devices can be profound and game-changing."   Story Source:   Materials provided by The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). Note: Content may be edited for style and length.
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