Description
A bulldozer is a type of off-road vehicle which is equipped with a significant metal plate/blade. It is utilized in construction and conversion work in order to push large quantities of soil, sand, debris, or other such materials. Bulldozers equipped for warfare engineering roles are often tailored with armor in order to protect the driver from debris and others material, which enables bulldozers to be utilized in combat zones. It is a modification in the regular application bulldozer and is known as an armored bulldozer.
Description
Advanced driver-assistance systems, or ADAS, are systems to help the driver in the driving process. Autonomous driving is supported by cloud data, car-to-car communication, and car-to-infrastructure communication. In consequence, ADAS systems must link to a vehicle's communication module directly to enable fully autonomous driving
Description
Advanced driver-assistance systems, or ADAS, are systems to help the driver in the driving process. Autonomous driving is supported by cloud data, car-to-car communication, and car-to-infrastructure communication. In consequence, ADAS systems must link to a vehicle's communication module directly to enable fully autonomous driving
Description
An automotive head-up display or automotive heads-up display —also known as a auto-HUD— is any transparent display that presents data in the automobile without requiring users to look away from their usual viewpoints. The origin of the name stems from a pilot being able to view information with the head positioned "up" and looking forward, instead of angled down looking at lower instruments. At this time, there are two different approaches to OEM HUDs in automobiles. The first is to treat the back of the windshield in such a way that an image projected onto it will reflect to the driver. The second is to have a small combiner that is separate from the windshield. Combiners can be retracted.
Description
An automotive head-up display or automotive heads-up display —also known as a auto-HUD— is any transparent display that presents data in the automobile without requiring users to look away from their usual viewpoints. The origin of the name stems from a pilot being able to view information with the head positioned "up" and looking forward, instead of angled down looking at lower instruments. At this time, there are two different approaches to OEM HUDs in automobiles. The first is to treat the back of the windshield in such a way that an image projected onto it will reflect to the driver. The second is to have a small combiner that is separate from the windshield. Combiners can be retracted.